Vinyl Flooring

Best Flooring for Pet Lovers
Our dogs and cats are essentially four-legged parts of our family, so it’s frustrating when your best friend destroys your flooring or uses it as their own personal outhouse or scratching post. Because pets are so vital to their families, rather than becoming frustrated and allowing your beloved dog or cat to destroy the flooring, choosing the best flooring for pets (and you!) will save you hours of time and heartache.
You wouldn’t choose a pet that wasn’t a good fit for your family, and you should follow the same guidelines with your floors. But which types of flooring are ideal for pets?
Let’s look at the many sorts and the best options for cats, dogs, and their families!
VINYL PLANK FLOORING.
This isn’t your mother’s sheet roll floor or the ancient stick-on tiles from your college apartment. Today’s vinyl flooring is commonly offered in slats or planks that resemble “real wood” flooring.
Three typical choices for vinyl flooring materials:
Luxury Vinyl plank or tile (LVP/LVT) is installed as a glue-down product and has a water-resistant top wear layer.
Wood Plastic Composite (WPC) has a hard core made of wood and plastic, and may include underlayment padding. Stone Plastic Composite (SPC) has a stiff core made of stone and plastic, and may also contain underlayment cushioning.
WPC & SPC Vinyl flooring is ideal for pets since it is waterproof and installed as a “floating floor” (not permanently fastened to the subfloor), preventing moisture from penetrating the subflooring. In other words, if your animal best buddy has an accident, it will not destroy the floor! There are durable, scuff- and scratch-resistant choices that are reasonably priced. Many offer DIY-friendly “click-lock” installation if you choose to do it yourself. Or, contact us for a free quote and let our skilled flooring installers assist you!
TILE
Tile is one of the most resilient, timeless, and popular flooring solutions. Tile is available in a wide range of styles, materials, and finishes, giving you nearly unlimited alternatives. Ceramic and porcelain floors are two of the most popular and best options for pets since they are sealed and glazed for added protection when compared to natural stone tile.
Once tile is properly put, it is exceedingly difficult to harm or taint the tile. However, if you own a pet, you may want to consider stain-resistant grout or additional grout sealing. It’s a worthwhile purchase to save future cleaning and stains from your animal buddies.
LAMINATE FLOORING
If you desire wood floors but want to save money, laminate may be a good choice for your pet’s family. Laminate flooring is laid “floating” like vinyl WPC or SPC flooring, although it is not normally waterproof. Laminate replicates the appearance of actual hardwood floors by attaching a digital “picture” of wood grain on a backing made of HDF composite materials.
Laminate plank flooring is top-layer moisture resistant, especially when cleaned quickly after a spill. Moisture or puddles left on most laminates will be absorbed, causing the flooring to bulge and buckle. So be careful when housebreaking your new puppy!

Solid Wood Flooring
This is the top of the woodpile, both literally and metaphorically! Hardwood floors are usually nailed down and completed on-site. While the grain/pattern is determined by the species of wood, you may select a stain color that, when paired with a urethane finish, produces a long-lasting protective layer that can withstand your dog’s nails as he rounds the corner during his nocturnal zoomies.
For people who are environmentally conscious, a water-based polyurethane can be utilized instead of standard oil-based materials. Excessive moisture will cause the flooring to deform and deteriorate, although they are resistant to surface wetness, spills, and accidents. Solid wood floors, unlike plywood-backed engineered wood, can be refinished numerous times, allowing the flooring to last a lifetime. Avoid softer wood species (bamboo, pine, etc.) because they are highly absorbent and offer little protection against your furry family member’s foot traffic. Wood flooring, on the other hand, are not cheap, with prices ranging from the mid- to high-end.
Engineered Wood Floors
Engineered wood is another excellent wood flooring option that combines the benefits of laminate and solid wood. Engineered wood floors consist of a thin layer of hardwood and a “wear layer” on top of a multilayer wood or poly-composite core. Some engineered flooring with a thicker top-wood layer can be sanded and restored if scratches or spills become an issue.
Engineered wood floors come in a variety of finishes, quality, colors, and patterns. Surface wetness or minor spills that are quickly cleaned up are OK on engineered flooring, but excessive moisture can permanently harm the surface. Many engineered wood floors, like solid wood floors, can be scratched, but with the correct protective coating, they will easily withstand those nails!
CARPET
Many carpet flooring options designed exclusively for pets are now available, providing enhanced stain and filth resistance. Buyer beware, however, as moisture and stains can still pass through the carpet backing and into the flooring. Cat owners who have attempted to clean carpet are well aware of the difficulty, but it is not limited to the feline.
Make sure to buy pet-friendly carpets with a moisture backing. Combining this with a moisture-proof pad creates a more lasting and pleasant alternative for both humans and dogs. Pay particular attention to weave alternatives, since Berber or continuous weave products might be unraveled by a frisky puppy or scratching kitten.
Carpet is a warm, traditional flooring option that can endure for many years with pets, but it has a short wear life and will most likely need to be changed every ten years or so.

CONCRETE
Finished concrete flooring has become increasingly popular in recent years. Concrete, which was once relegated to industrial and commercial spaces, is extremely durable and resistant to stains, spills, and messes when properly treated.
Colored concrete flooring stain can be used to brighten the appearance of the floor. In many parts of the country, timber-frame dwellings are often limited to the foundation levels or first floor, while high-rise flats or condominiums are frequently built with a concrete base for the floors. Acid etching, grinding, or patching may be necessary to prepare the concrete for staining and finishing. To prevent moisture absorption, use a water prevention layer similar to that found on a wood floor.
Concrete is perhaps the “coldest” and “hardest” of the flooring alternatives, but when done well, it can be a stunning addition to your home.

Vinyl Flooring